Ethical Responses to Genocide

Fall Courses 2022
JST 204 01W, 02W and 03W: An Introduction to Holocaust and Genocide Studies: Stories of Resistance, Rescue, and Survival

Home

David Pettigrew, PhD,
Philosophy Department,
Southern Connecticut State University

email: pettigrewd1@southernct.edu


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*****Syllabus******

SCSU Fall 2022 Professor Pettigrew, Office: EN D212, x26778

JST 204 01W MWF 10:10am- 11:00am

JST 204 02W MWF 11:10am- 12:00noon

JST 204 03W TR 9:35am - 10:50am

Office Hours: MW 12:10PM-2:10PM; TR 12:30 -1:30PM; and by appointment. Office hours can be arranged in-person and on-line.

JST 204 01W, 02W, 03W An Introduction to Holocaust and Genocide Studies: Stories of Resistance, Rescue, and Survival (An LEP Tier II Global Awareness course)

My primary concern is with your academic achievement as part of our intellectual community at Southern Connecticut State University. In other words, I care about your learning and your success in finalour class as well as in your other classes and beyond. With this in mind, I have designed a syllabus and website, along with clarifications, scheduling, written assignments, reading guides, web links, draft introductions for papers, and other elements, to support your learning. I encourage you to study the course syllabus carefully. I am available in class and during my office hours to support your engagement of the reading assignments, films, web materials and other learning resources. I am available in class and during my office hours to support your accomplishment of the written assignments. Our course syllabus is designed to help you achieve academic success within the context of the learning objectives (See Appendix A: Learning Objectives). Once again, do not hesitate to ask questions, I am here to help you.

Our course will revolve around close readings of texts, critical viewings and discussions of films, dialogical class discussions and written assignments (analytical, argumentative essays). A series of four written assignments will help further refine your writing and critical thinking skills in many respects, including your ability to identify the thesis, to organize the paper, to focus in each respective section of the paper, to cite relevant passages from required sources, and to craft a synthetic conclusion. (*Please see a further discussion related to our written assignments below at “*I. Written Assignments and Grades”).

Our course will investigate the manipulation, by political leaders, of historical prejudices, fears, and hatreds in the case of each of the genocides (e.g., Armenian genocide, Holocaust, and the genocides in Bosnia, and Rwanda). In each case the hatred of the other was activated through a process of dehumanization and demonization, whether targeted at the “Turks” (in Bosnia) or the “Inyenzi” (Tutsis in Rwanda). In each case we will investigate an “apparatus of genocide,” including, for example, the systematic process of dehumanization, the use of media to propagate demonizing stereotypes, hate speech and racist rhetoric. In each case we will study specific details with respect to the singularity of the suffering of the human beings who were systematically dehumanized.) In this process students will learn about the historical, geographical and cultural dimensions relevant to each of the genocides. Through our readings, films, discussions, and written assignments, we will draw critical analogies between the Holocaust as well as the genocides in the Ottoman Empire (Armenian genocide), Bosnia, and Rwanda. For example, we can consider the extent to which, in each case, political leaders manipulated dehumanizing stereotypes for political gain. Further, we can consider the extent to which the dehumanization of the victims led to a devaluation that led in turn to catastrophic violence against the victims. We will use the analogies as an aid to understanding the individual cases. By identifying a significant similarity between the Holocaust and the genocides in the Ottoman Empire (Armenian genocide) and in Bosnia, for example, we can speculate about strategies for preventing such dehumanizing rhetoric by political leaders. In other words, by recognizing an operative model in different cases, students will investigate a basis for addressing the problem of genocide as such. As a result of such interdisciplinary analyses of the causes of genocide, along with the consideration of stories of resistance, rescue and survival, we will brainstorm about possible strategies for genocide prevention through modes of intervention and education.

Week One: Introductory Remarks about the Syllabus and our Studies

Selected Reading: Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Preface and Chapter 1.

Week Two: Introduction to the Armenian Genocide

Selected Reading:
Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapter 1.
Jones, Adam. “The Armenian Genocide.” Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction. New York: Routledge, 2010.

Required Film: Ararat. DVD. Directed by Atom Agoyan. Canada/France, 2002. On reserve in Buley library and available for purchase on-line.

Week Three: Armenian Genocide

Kiernan, Ben. “The Armenian Genocide: National Chauvinism in the Waning Ottoman Empire.” Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Required Film: Ararat. DVD. Directed by Atom Agoyan. Canada/France, 2002. On reserve in Buley library and available for purchase on-line.

Week Four: Armenian Genocide: Review of all Readings and Film for the Written Assignment

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapter 1.

Jones, Adam. “The Armenian Genocide.” Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction. New York: Routledge, 2010.

Kiernan, Ben. “The Armenian Genocide: National Chauvinism in the Waning Ottoman Empire.” Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Required Film: Ararat. DVD. Directed by Atom Agoyan. Canada/France, 2002. On reserve in Buley library and available for purchase on-line.

Armenian Refugees 1915-1916 Photographed by Armin Wegner http://www.armenian-genocide.org/photo_wegner.html

First written assignment: Detailed instructions for each written assignment as well as the due-date and time will be distributed well in advance of the assignment.

Week Five: The Holocaust

Fry, Varian. Surrender on Demand. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books, 1997. (photocopy) Selected chapters: “Foreword,” “Original Unpublished Foreword.”

Varian Fry, New York Times article, July 17, 1935.

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapters 2-3.

Weeks Six and Seven: The Holocaust

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapters 4-5.

Levi, Primo. Survival at Auschwitz. New York: Touchstone, 1996. Selected chapters: Chapter 1 “The Journey,”
Chapter 2 “On the Bottom,”
Chapter 3 “Initiation”,
Chapter 4 “Ka-Be,”
Chapter 9 “The Drowned and the Saved,”
Chapter 11” The Canto of Ulysses.”

We will also study the following links on the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website and others:
1) Antisemitism, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005175
2) The Reichstag Fire Decree, 1933 , https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/the-enabling-act
3) The Enabling Act, 1933, https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/the-enabling-act
4) Nuremberg Laws, 1935, https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/the-nuremberg-race-laws
5)  Examples of Anti-Semitic Legislation 1933-1939 http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007459
6) Kristallnacht, A Nationwide Pogrom, November 9-10, 1938, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005201
7) Kindertransport 1938-1940, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005260
8) Entartete Kunst ["Degenerate Art”],1937, The 1937 exhibit of ENTARTETE KUNST at the Archeological Institute in Munich,
http://www.ushmm.org/online/film/display/detail.php?file_num=670
ADDITIONAL SOURCES RE: "Degenerate Art* (Each source refers to Marc Chagall)
http://www.jewishbookcouncil.org/book/degenerate-art-the-attack-on-modern-art-in-nazi-germany-1937
http://www.philamuseum.org/research/98-108.html?page=2
9) Theresienstadt, November 24, 1941 - May 9, 1945, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005424
10) Einsatzgruppen, (1941-1944), https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/einsatzgruppen
11) Wannsee Conference and the “Final Solution,”January 20, 1942, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005477
12) Killing Centers, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007327
13) Speech of the Reichsführer-SS (Heinrich Himmler) at the SS Group Leader Meeting in Posen (Poznan) 4- October-1943

Second Written Assignment: Detailed instructions for each written assignment as well as the due-date and time will be distributed well in advance of the assignment.

Week Eight: Bosnia

Neuffer, Elizabeth. The Key to My Neighbor’s House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda,
Prologue, Chapter 1 Blood Ties to Blood Feuds,
Chapter 2 The Triumph of the Underworld.

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapter 9.

Please note: Welcome to Sarajevo. DVD. Directed by Michael Winterbottom. 1997.

Week Nine: Bosnia

Neuffer, Elizabeth. The Key to My Neighbor’s House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda,
Chapter 3 Since Unhappily We Cannot Always Avoid Wars, Chapter 6 No Safe Havens, Chapter 9 Bring Me His Body.

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapter 11.

Week Ten: Bosnia

A screening of Dr. Pettigrew’s documentary, The Geography of Genocide in Bosnia: Redeeming the Earth, DVD (USA 2011 50 min) will be arranged.
A Presentation of Dr. Pettigrew’s research concerning the work of the International Commission on Missing Persons in Bosnia.
Case Studies from the ICTY: http://www.icty.org/
Indictments of Karadžić and Mladić.
Web resource: http://home.southernct.edu/~pettigrewd1/Bosnia.html

Week Eleven: Bosnia

Third Written Assignment: Detailed instructions for each written assignment as well as the due-date and time will be distributed well in advance of the assignment.

Week Twelve: Rwanda

Philip Gourevitch. We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda,
Chapters 3, 4, 7.

Hotel Rwanda. DVD. Directed by Terry George. 2004.

Week Thirteen: Rwanda

Philip Gourevitch. We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda,
Chapters 8, 9 &10.

Case Studies from the ICTR :
United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. http://www.unictr.org
Judgement and Sentence for ELIZAPHAN and GÉRARD NTAKIRUTIMANA:
Indictment for AUGUSTIN BIZIMUNGU
Summary Judgment against HASSAN NGEZE

Week Fourteen: Rwanda

Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York HarperPerennial Edition, 2007. Chapter 10.



Final Exam Schedule : TBD

Group presentations will be made during the final exam time.

In-class group presentations:
"Genocide Against the Tutsis in Rwanda"


Group presentations: Critical identification of causes, effects regarding the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda
. Students will make group presentations based on assigned chapters from Gourevitch (Chps. 4, 7, 9 and 10), Power (Chp. 10), as well as based on the film (Hotel Rwanda). Each group presentation will identify causes and effects of the genocide and reflect on strategies for prevention. Each group will read passages from the assigned chapters also raise questions for discussion with the class. Those presenting on the film will discuss specific scenes.

I. General Guidelines for Group Presentations:

* All members of the group must play an equally significant role in the presentation.

* Each group will have a total of twelve minutes for the presentation: approximately nine minutes for the presentation and three minutes for discussion with the members of the class.

II.  Requirements. Each Group Must:

* present the analytic framework regarding the identification of causes and effects of the genocide and indicate whether the group's Chapter addresses causes, effects, or both;

* read relevant passages from the assigned Chapters in Gourevitch or Power (or describe scenes and report dialogue from the Film) supporting your identification of causes or effects of the genocide;

* suggest strategies for genocide prevention, reflecting first, in the context of your assigned chapter, and second, in the broader context of our discussions this semester;

* engage in discussion with the class regarding the presentation


ADDITIONAL Important Information about our course:


*I. Written Assignments and Grades
Grades will be based on a series of written assignments (argumentative essays) (4-6 pages). Assignments will be assessed on the basis of a detailed outline. Students will work on assignments that help them acquire and process the content of the course. In this process of “writing to learn” students will also become habituated to developing written arguments that include introductions, transitions, and cogent reference to the required text in the process of completing the paper. Your professor may assign additional assignments if he deems such assignments necessary to support the pedagogical goals of the course. For example, scaffolding activities will be assigned or conducted in class, as part of which students will identify selected passages from the relevant texts to use in the assignments. Each essay will have an equal value in the calculation of the final grade. One must complete all assignments for the course.

Assignments must be completed by the announced due date. Any written assignment submitted past the stated deadline will receive a full grade deduction. The assignment is due at the beginning of class on the stated due date. Seven calendar days after the stated due date the assignment will no longer be accepted. If paper is submitted past the announced due date you will not be permitted to revise the paper for a better grade.

A further note about our written assignments. A "W" course encourages a process of ongoing writing activity and revisions.

First, you are strongly encouraged to bring a first draft of any of the assignments to my office hours for review. We will discuss a strategy for improving the essay before the date of submission.

Second, the written assignments of the course are designed so that each successive written assignment will build upon the previous assignment. That is to say that each of our four-part argumentative essays will take a similar form, including an introduction, two sections addressing the content of the argument and a conclusion. In addition, each essay will include a topic sentence in the introduction and will include excerpts from the required readings.

Third, when your written assignment is returned to you with a grade and with my extensive comments, you will be strongly encouraged to revise the paper. The revision would be due two weeks after you receive the graded assignment. In order to revise a paper for a better grade you are required to meet with me in my office to identify what needs to be revised and to set the date for the re-submission of the assignment. However, revising a paper for a better grade is not the only or the best reason for re-writing a paper. You need to make your best effort to accomplish the written assignment the first time that you write the assignment. Generally the grade on such rewritten or revised assignments will improve by half a letter grade (for example, a paper with a grade of C+ (77) would generally improve to a C+/B- or a B- (80 or 83). Revising such a paper does not refer primarily to correcting spelling, grammar, contractions, colloquial expressions, or references. Although all of those would need to be corrected, revising a paper for a better grade will involve substantial restructuring and rewriting, objectives to be identified and clarified during our meeting. Again, students are encouraged to bring first drafts of any of the papers to me for my review during office hours. If you submit a paper late you will not be permitted to revise the paper.

You will receive the details and due dates for each written assignment well in advance of each written assignment.

Plagiarism: In written assignments students must cite their sources: extracting direct quotes or making indirect reference to a source both require references with page numbers. Quotes and indirect references for the written assignments must come from the assigned readings and films. No quotes or references from the internet will be permitted for written assignments during the semester (except as required and specified by the Professor). Plagiarism is prohibited (see Student Handbook for discussion of "Prohibited Conduct"). Plagiarism will result in a grade of "F" for the paper and may result in grade of "F" for the course. If you have any questions about these requirements or restrictions do not hesitate to ask questions in class or during office hours.


II. Resources: Required readings, films, and websites.

Books to be purchased:
Gourevitch, Philip. We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda. New York: Picador, 1998.
Levi, Primo. Survival at Auschwitz. New York: Touchstone, 1996.
Power, Samantha. “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide. New York: Harper, Perennial Edition, 2007.
Neuffer, Elizabeth. The Key to My Neighbor’s House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda. New York: Picador, 2001.

Required Readings: Selected pages will be photocopied and provided to you or provided on line:
Fry, Varian. Surrender on Demand. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books, 1997.
Jones, Adam. Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction. New York: Routledge, 2010.
Kiernan, Ben. Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

You are always required to have the assigned readings ***with you in/during class***. We will undertake a close, detailed (line-by-line) reading and analysis of selected passages in class. This will be the work that is at the core of the educational experience of the class. Many of these passages that we will discuss and interpret will be essential in your written assignments. The books are available for your purchase in the bookstore or in some cases will be provided in photocopied form.

Selected Websites:
Ethical Responses to Genocide, A Course-dedicated website, http://home.southernct.edu/~pettigrewd1/index.html.
United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. http://www.unictr.org.
United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. http://www.icty.org.
http://home.southernct.edu/~pettigrewd1/RaphaelLemkin.html
http://www.preventgenocide.org/lemkin/index.html
1) Kindertransport 1938-1940, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005260;
2) Theresienstadt, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005424;
3) Entartete Kunst [Degenerate Art”], http://www.ushmm.org/online/film/display/detail.php?file_num=670;
4) Kristallnacht, A Nationwide Pogrom, November 9-10, 1938, http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005201;
5) Wannsee Conference and the “Final Solution,” http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005477

Films: On Reserve in Buley Library and available for purchase on-line.
Ararat. DVD. Directed by Atom Agoyan. Canada/France, 2002.
Hotel Rwanda. DVD. Directed by Terry George. UK/USA/South Africa, 2004.
Welcome to Sarajevo. DVD. Directed by Michael Winterbottom. UK, 1997.

III. Policy on Punctuality and Attendance:
Attendance and Punctuality are Required. The learning culture of the class involves class dialogues that are indispensable to our engagement of the readings and the ideas they entail. One cannot miss the classes, for example, and then write a meaningful paper about the material. If you are involved in an activity that will make it difficult or inconvenient for you to attend the classes then I would advise you to take a different class if possible.

Absences, and tardy arrivals may affect your grade. I have developed a series of guidelines to encourage you to attend class. I state these attendance and punctuality guidelines here clearly for you.

If you are more than 5 minutes late for any class, you will receive an L (Late). If you receive six L's (for a TR class ) nine L's (for a MWF class) your grade will be reduced by a full letter grade.

If you are absent from class you will receive an "Abs" (Absent) designation. If you receive ten "Abs" (in a MWF class) or if you receive seven "Abs" (in a TR class) your grade will be reduced by a full letter grade (for example from a B to a C). If you are absent thirteen days (in a MWF class) or nine days (in a TR class) your grade may be reduced by an additional letter grade. As a consequence of this attendance policy there are no medical, sports related or other reasons  needed for justification for missing classes and no need for any documentation in this regard is needed. The attendance policy then, values and respects the sanctity of the classroom, on the one hand, and your privacy, on the other hand. Attendance is required.

*Please note that as a result of this policy, one can potentially be absent from three weeks of class without those absences having any impact on your grade. My priority is to support your learning as individuals who are forging a unique path in higher education, and I always make an effort to make exceptions as needed and as appropriate.  However, it is important to realize that if one needs to be absent from class for any reason --due to circumstances beyond one's control for 3 to 4 weeks or more--it then becomes very difficult--if not impossible--to complete the required assignments of the course. The required essays involve responding to a highly detailed assignments which are the actual subject of the classe discussions that would be missed if one was absent. In other words, one must write the assignments that are assigned as part of the class and covered in detail as part of the class lectures and discussions. Further, the final assignment of the course is a group presentation which requires being in-class for the preparations and requires attendance at the time of the presentation.  

**Covid 19 protocols: See https://inside.southernct.edu/covid19 .These Covid 19 protocols may change depending on University or System Office policy changes.

A note on our final exam period: Since we do not have a final exam (we have a final paper), we are required to hold a class during the final exam time. Please be sure to plan to be present during the designated time for our final exam as we will hold our group presentations at that time.

Final Exam Schedule

JST 204 01 W TBD
JST 204 02 W TBD
JST 204 03 W TBD


IV. Other policies

Cell phones: The learning culture of the class involves class dialogues that are indispensable to our engagement of the readings and the ideas they entail. Such an inquiry-based approach requires your constant attention. Any electronic devices or forms of behavior that would distract you or other students from our inquiries are counterproductive to our learning objectives and to your success. However if your book/source is on your cellphone you can certainly use your phone. Also, if there is some reason you need to use your phone you can certainly leave the class to do so.

Laptop computers: The learning culture of the class involves class dialogues that are indispensable to our engagement of the readings and the ideas they entail. Such an inquiry-based approach requires your constant attention. Any electronic devices or forms of behavior that would distract you or other students from our inquiries are counterproductive to our learning objectives and to your success.. However, if you need to use your laptop to take notes or if your book/source is on your computer then you can certainly use your laptop.

Southern Connecticut State University provides reasonable accommodations in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, for students with documented disabilities on an individualized basis.  If you are a student with a documented disability, the University’s Disability Resource Center (DRC) can work with you to determine appropriate accommodations.  Before you receive accommodations in this class, you will need to make an appointment with the Disability Resource Center located at EN C-105A (203-392-6828).  To discuss your approved accommodations with me or other concerns, such as medical emergencies or arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment to meet as soon as possible. My office location and hours listed above.

APPENDIX A : JST 204 W Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives Students will…

1. undertake careful, close textual reading of primary sources, Through the assigned reading of selected passages from primary texts (Primo Levi, Varian Fry, Samantha Power, Ben Kiernan and Adam Jones), and the discussion of the passages in class in order to assist students to gather the meaning of the passages, students will learn to read and interpret passages on their own.
2. develop critical thinking skills, skills of argumentation and skills of written expression. Students will learn to make appropriate and focused references to scholarly texts. Through class discussions about the reading materials and written assignments students will be encouraged to draw analogies between the instances of dehumanizing objectification that led to catastrophic violence during the Holocaust and genocides in the Ottoman Empire (Armenian genocide), Bosnia and Rwanda. Students will produce written assignments (analytical, argumentative essays) according to guidelines encouraging organization and focus, including required scholarly reference to the relevant text (learning both Chicago-style and MLA format). These assignments will argue the position according to the guidelines outlined in the assignment, thus habituating students to the practice of successfully writing critical argumentative essays. A similar structure will be outlined in successive assignments such that students can build upon their experience from assignment to assignment.
3. relate course material to real-life situations. Course readings and assignments will be drawn from real-life situations, including the Holocaust and genocides in the 20th century. Through the selected readings and assignments designed for the course students will be encouraged to draw analogies between the Holocaust and the genocides of the past century and to think of strategies for preventing future genocides.
4. become aware of and question unexamined assumptions and values. Through our course readings and discussions students will be encouraged to consider traditional assumptions such as “genocide happens because some people are evil,” or, “history repeats itself,” by considering the extent to which ethnic and religious animosities are socially constructed and exacerbated by political leaders.
5. recognize the similarities in the processes of different genocides (apparatus of genocide) through readings, class discussions, and in written assignments.
6. recognize the dehumanizing objectification (apparatus of genocide) that leads to genocide as being operative in a number of genocides through engagement in class discussions.
7. experience empathy for the suffering of the other, imagining a pre-normative bond between human beings.
8. undertake an interdisciplinary analysis of the causes of genocides (e.g., historical, geographical , political and cultural dimensions) through class discussions and written assignments.
9. propose a prevention plan for a given dehumanizing objectification or predictors of genocide in class discussions.
10. interpret course information in written assignments about genocides.
11. articulate their analyses and interpretations in written assignments.
12. draw analogies between the instances of dehumanizing objective violence that led to the Holocaust and to genocide in the Ottoman Empire, Bosnia and Rwanda, during class discussions and in written assignments.
13. draw analogies between the Holocaust and the genocides of the past century and to think of strategies for preventing future genocides.
14. reflect on the decisions made by “rescuers,” who resisted the Holocaust and Genocides in order to save lives, in their readings, class discussions and written assignments.
15. become critically aware of the variety of different kinds of sources such as books, witness literature, films and websites will model comprehensive research, critical evaluation of sources, and facilitate complex synthesis of sources in discussions and assignments.

Appendix B: Additional information about written assignments.

Students will work on assignments that help them acquire and process the content of the course. In this process of “writing to learn” the students will also become habituated to developing written arguments. Students will learn to be sure that their papers in include introductions, transitions, cogent reference to the required text in the process of completing the paper and a sequential argument.
Further, written assignments will reinforce Key Element #4 Learning Outcome for the LEP CT, namely, "Student will be able to write a well-reasoned and well-supported argumentative essay that draws upon reliable evidence.” The Rubric for the assessment of CT Key Element #4 (D. Synthesis) involves the following main points:

1. A central claim is clearly communicated.

2. The essay is well structured and clearly communicates the logical relations between paragraphs and sections. The reader is guided through a chain of reasoning or progression of ideas.

3. The essay develops a persuasive argument.

4. The essay uses examples or evidence to support each point. In the case of our assignments, the examples or evidence will come from the required films and readings, and occasionally, if specified, from a particular website.

5. The essay is free or spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors.

6. The context for the discussion is developed appropriately and clearly articulated.

Appendix C

This course fulfills the Tier 2, Global Awareness category of our general education requirements, the Liberal Education Program. The purpose of the Global Awareness category is to acquaint students with perspectives on current world affairs not centered in the American experience. To be effective citizens, students need to know and understand the conditions of others around the globe and the relationships and connections between self, local surroundings, and the broader world. 

The main objectives of this category are: 

1)     Area or Phenomenon outside the United States – Understanding a specific geographical region or phenomenon of international significance (e.g., the Middle East, sustainability, or globalization). 

2)     Contemporary Implications – Gaining significant insight into contemporary world issues. 

3)     Non-U.S. Perspectives – Exploring non-American points of view and ways of life. 

In addition to covering these objectives, this course will also reemphasize at least three Tier 1 competencies: Critical Thinking, Written Communication, and Information Literacy.

 

 

Our agreement concerning a shared commitment to classroom decorum and student success.

This agreement sets forth guidelines for our class that have been designed to support your academic achievement. The guidelines are provided for you because your Professor cares about your success in this class as well as in your other classes and other endeavors.  In addition, these expectations indicate our shared concern for the learning environment of the class, on the one hand, as well as your respect for your fellow students and for your Professor, on the other hand. In this context, we can insure that together we will foster an environment that is conducive to learning. Here are the guidelines:

1. The learning culture of the class involves class dialogues that are indispensable to our engagement of the readings and the ideas they entail. Such an inquiry-based approach requires your constant attention. Any electronic devices or forms of behavior that would distract you or other students from our inquiries are counterproductive to our learning objectives and to your success.
2. Students are not permitted to sleep in class and students are discouraged from lying down on their desks during class.
3. Students are strongly encouraged to remain in class during class so they do not miss important discussions and announcements (Of course, there are many legitimate reasons that may cause one, from time to time, to step out of class briefly.)
4. Students are strongly discouraged from carrying on discussions with their neighbors during class (unless assigned as part of small group discussions!).
5. Students are not permitted to work on assignments for other classes during our class.
6. Students must bring the assigned readings to class. We will undertake a close, detailed (line-by-line) reading and analysis of selected passages in class. This will be the work that is at the core of the educational experience of the class. Further, these passages that we will discuss and interpret will be essential in your written assignments.

In summary, the learning culture of our class involves class dialogues that are indispensable to our engagement of the readings and the ideas entailed therein. Our inquiry-based approach requires your constant attention and involvement. Any electronic devices or forms of behavior that would distract you or other students from our inquiries are not recommended. These then are our guidelines and also my expectations. I look forward to participating with you in a mutually supportive and productive learning environment, an environment that will help you be successful within the context of the learning objectives of our course as well as your other courses.

Required Statements for the Syllabus

This course fulfills the Tier 2, Global Awareness category of our general education requirements, the Liberal Education Program.
The purpose of the Global Awareness category is to acquaint students with perspectives on current world affairs not centered in the American experience. To be effective citizens, students need to know and understand the conditions of others around the globe and the relationships and connections between self, local surroundings, and the broader world. 

The main objectives of this category are: 

1)     Area or Phenomenon outside the United States – Understanding a specific geographical region or phenomenon of international significance (e.g., the Middle East, sustainability, or globalization). 

2)     Contemporary Implications – Gaining significant insight into contemporary world issues. 

3)     Non-U.S. Perspectives – Exploring non-American points of view and ways of life. 

In addition to covering these objectives, this course will also reemphasize at least three Tier 1 competencies: Critical Thinking, Written Communication, and  Information Literacy.


Syllabus Statements: 

Required Statement on W Courses 

Writing-Intensive Courses, often called W-Courses and designated by a W in the course listing, are courses that require students to apply writing in their understanding of the course content. As such, W- courses require students to write and revise their written work regularly with at least 50% of their grade in the course linked to the quality and content of their written submissions. The instructor of the W-course will outline and teach specific writing goals and provide individualized feedback on how students can improve their writing skills. Students should anticipate growth in both content knowledge and writing ability.

Title IX / Sexual Misconduct: Southern Connecticut State University is highly committed to providing you with an educational experience that is academically and socially enriching. In line with this mission, we enforce Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 which prohibits acts of sexual misconduct (sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation and stalking) at educational institutions. To report sexual misconduct students should contact Paula Rice, Title IX Coordinator, Office of Diversity and Equity, at (203) 392-5491and/or the Office of Student Conduct and Civic Responsibility, at (203) 392-7220, and/or University Police at (203) 392-5375 or 911for emergencies. Further information including your Title IX rights and reporting procedures visit the Title IX website at www.southernct.edu/sexual-misconduct and/or the Support and Resource Team (S.A.R.T.) website at https://inside.southernct.edu/vpas/sart. For 24/7 Advocacy, please contact the University's Victim Advocate at (203) 687-1252. The Violence Prevention, Victim Advocacy and Support (VPAS) Center, located in Schwartz Hall, room 100, is available for assistance or any questions regarding support and advocacy. 

 Mental Health & Wellbeing: Your physical and mental health are critical to your learning and success. Southern has a comprehensive range of supports available to enhance your holistic wellbeing, including the Wellbeing Center, the Food Pantry, Counseling Services, Health Services, Recreation and Fitness, Alcohol and Drug Services and Recovery Services, and Violence Prevention, Victim Advocacy and Support (VPAS). For more information, please visit southernct.edu/wellbeing or call 203-392-7330. Disability Accommodation: Southern Connecticut State University provides reasonable accommodations in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, for students with documented disabilities on an individualized basis. If you are a student with a documented disability, the University’s Center for Academic Success and Accessibility Services (CASAS) can work with you to determine appropriate accommodations. Before you receive accommodations in this class, you will need to make an appointment with CASAS, located on the 3rd Floor of Buley Library. To discuss your approved accommodations with me or other concerns, such as medical emergencies or arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment to meet as soon as possible. 

 https://inside.southernct.edu/faculty-development/syllabus-statements/casas 

 Policy on Reporting Non-Attendance or Non-Participation: In order to ensure compliance with the United States Department of Education (US DoE) financial aid reporting requirements, Southern Connecticut State University monitors attendance and reports all students who stop attending or participating in on-ground classes or stop participating in online classes to the US DoE. This policy pertains to undergraduate and graduate students. Group 1: Students who never attended/participated Students who have never attended or participated in a class by the end of the third week of the semester will be reported to the Registrar via the designated electronic reporting portal. Pending further clarification, the student will be removed from the class roster by the Registrar's office. Group 2: Students who stopped attending/participating Students who have attended at least one class, but subsequently stop attending/participating will receive a grade of FS. The faculty member will enter this grade and include the last date of participation. The grade should be entered as soon as the instructor is aware of the failure to attend/participate but at a minimum when submitting midterm and final grades. The FS grade will appear as an F on student transcripts. .